46.1 Miles


photo Christi Barli
 

Monday 7:30pm EDT 51:47 Swim time

Status Update

As of this evening, Diana has traveled 46.1 statute miles. She is well into the gulf stream and doing fine although chilly at times.


This wind forecast chart shows a gently breeze marked in purple. (Pray For Purple!)

The team is preparing for the dusk hours which have proven to be prime hours for jellyfish.


photo by Angel Yanagihara

Diana had a mental lift today when her ‘friends boat’ arrived to surprise her with friends and family making the trip and showing support.


photo Christi Barli

–Angie Sollinger aboard Quest


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Making Herstory Using History


photo Christi Barli
 

Monday 7:15pm EST 51:32 Swim time

Making herstory using history

Approaching the 40th hour of The Nyad swimming, her McGyver-like team has spent the afternoon improvising ways to prevent hypothermia and further swelling of Diana’s lips and tongue. As on any faraway expedition, you can only use what’s at hand and hope you have what you need. Will tell you later about the desperate “remedies” the team is calmly employing to try to keep Diana’s lips from swelling even more than they are already. But right now the priority is to stave off hypothermia (the body’s core temperature lowering to dangerous levels).


photo Christi Barli

Anyone thinking Who can’t stay warm swimming in 85 degree water? has not witnessed what it’s like out here for Diana. The body’s core temperature is 98 degrees, and yesterday The Nyad was measured at 97.5. That’s good. But there’s been some shivering, both last night and today. That’s because there’s that risky difference of 13 degrees between the water and her core temperature, which over time will reduce the latter. She needs to keep warm, but how?


photo Christi Barli

Years ago, marathon swimmers smeared themselves with axel grease, which is black, to attract the sun in an attempt to hold the heat of the day against their skin during the cooler night. Diana’s team brought lanolin for Diana to smear under her bathing suit straps, etc., to reduce the inevitable friction of repetitive arm strokes. Monday afternoon, Diana’s team got an idea: they put black food coloring into that jar of lanolin to turn it into the “axel grease” of old, and are having Diana apply it to her bare skin while the sun is out, so it stores the heat and she can enter into the evening hours with a body temperature warmer than it is now. It’s like, a car painted black with the sun beating down on it becomes hotter inside than a car painted white; darker colors absorb the heat.


photo Christi Barli

A way to fashion the lanolin they have on hand into this historical device with simple food coloring, hopefully this will keep The Nyad warmer through the night and stave off hypothermia. Because that 14 degree differential between her temperature and that of the water gets exponentially more serious with each additional hour she spends in the water, dropping her core temperature. The medical team on board will be on watch.

The risk is great with someone with such a strong will. As observer and marathon swimming historian Steve Munatones said this afternoon, “The mind is always stronger than the body. In distance swimming, there’s a point where the mind can handle things that the body cannot.”

Regardless of the incredible shape Diana’s training put her in, 30 plus years ago as well as now, Diana has historically been known as much for her mind as for her athleticism. We all know her mind can handle it. But there will always be a point where a human body can’t go any farther. What no one knows is where that line is drawn in Diana Nyad.

–Candace Hogan aboard Quest


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Captain Beach reports on current conditions

Monday 3:04pm EDT 47:21 Swim time

Captain Beach reports on current conditions

Captain Brandon Beach files this report from aboard the Quest, which is carrying Diana’s media team.


We’re out here in the middle of the Florida straits about smack dab in the middle of the Gulf Stream, as it is. Headed about due north, but because of the Gulf Stream, we are making a slight track to the east, north east. Gulf Streams is just a few knots pushing to the east. Seas are pretty calm, got about one foot shop, single digit winds out of the south east. The skies are clear, the sun high in the sky. Otherwise it’s a pretty gorgeous day out here in the middle of the ocean.

–Captain Brandon Beach aboard the Quest


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Stormy Night


photo Christi Barli
 

Monday 5:24pm EDT 49:41 Swim time

Stormy Night

How about that Mother Nature’s sense of humor, right? Just tell her your plans…The last time I was able to get to a GPS connection, we reported what we might expect from the second night, since the first was a nightmare of jellyfish swarms. At least I thought it was safe to say that as nighttime approached, we expected it would be dark. Holy smokes! We had a big squall out here with the sky lit up all night with lightning flashing all around us. The 18-20 mile storm cell came on quickly but was slow to leave. As a Californian, I’ve never seen anything like it but apparently these 20 to 35-mile wind squalls are not unusual in the Gulf Stream. Lightning all around us, the sky almost like daylight more of the time than not. And I began to think, great—jellyfish are light-phobic, and now, thanks to the wind devas we won’t have to worry about them!


photo Christi Barli

Now as another night still looms ahead of us, and Diana is still swimming apace, I am put in mind of what she said last Wednesday night when I asked her about this swim, then upcoming, while she was packing for her flight to Cuba: “You’d think that with all this experience and planning that you’d know what to expect with these things, but I’ve learned that the only sure thing is that something always surprises you.”

–Candace Hogan aboard Quest


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Dr. Yanagihara reports on the jellyfish

Dr. Angel Yanagihara reports on Diana’s encounter with Jellyfish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo Christi Barli

Diana is doing very well. She swimming strong. The first night with complete nightmare. We really has a full plate dealing with multiple species of jelly. And our worst case fear was that she would encounter box jelly’s going across the Florida straits and she unfortunately did run across them literally. We had to pull a piece of tentacle off her fingers. I brought with me on board a microscope so I put the tentacle on the microscope to have a look at the stinging cells. We want to be able to have as much information as possible to consider what the best treatment options were going forward.

We responded with some treatments that I have developed at the University of Hawaii at my research lab, and reacted well to the treatment. She got some confidence back and reduced her pain. She went back out, just soldiering on. We went thru that about 8 times over the course of the nighttime hours. It was really exhausting just for us on the boat, but she kept going strong through all that.

When daylight came, we were all relieved. As anticipated, the zooplankton moved deeper in the water column and we had a glorious day. The daytimes have been quite wonderful and not facing this kind of sting hazard, but the night times have been pretty difficult. Having said that, we are swimming strong and looking good. We are all very proud of her and pleased to be part of this expedition. (photo: Christi Barli)

–Dr. Angel Yanagihara, jellyfish expert


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Isshin Denshin


photo Christi Barli
 

Monday 12:00pm EST 44:17 Swim time

Isshin Denshin Between Bonnie Stoll And Diana Nyad

Isshin denshin, the Japanese concept of mutual understanding and communication, is playing itself out during Diana Nyad’s 103-mile attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida.

Her business partner at Brava Body and her chief handler Bonnie Stoll have forged an ideal relationship between themselves. Stoll, formerly a world-class racquetball player, understands Nyad’s need and desire to prove her athleticism.

At the same time, Bonnie is her friend who can be completely open and honest with Nyad. She can talk to Nyad gently prodding her along… and harshly as she needs to encourage her along despite the inevitable challenges of the swim.

–Steve Munatones, observer

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Diana on CBS News

Diana Nyad attempts fourth Cuba-Florida Swim

 
August 19, 2012

Diana Nyad makes 4th Cuba-Florida swim attempt

Tammy Leitner with CBS News

Diana Nyad is making her fourth attempt to overcome the shark- and jellyfish-infested waters and become the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida.

Back On Course


video Gunnar Schrade
 

Monday 9:45am EDT 42:02 Swim time

We had quite a night. The weather was really ugly. All crew members safe.

As of this morning, the weather is clear with light winds out of the SE.

Seas are calm and Diana is swimming strong at 50 strokes per minute and has swum 33.81 statute miles. There have been no jellyfish sightings our experts report. Beautiful out!

–Angie Sollinger aboard Quest


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