Squall “nearly stationary over Diana”

Monday 2:30am EDT 34:47 Swim time

The storm was dying down, but it picked up again. Currently it is nearly stationary over Diana. The decision was made to wait for the squall to blow over. Ops Chief Mark Sollinger has been in close contact with Vanessa Linsley who is monitoring the radar in Key West.

Since it is not moving, they are now trying to find a path out of the storm. They have decided to begin moving north and west, close to the course that will take them to Key West anyways. Diana is safe, feeling strong and is now swimming again.

About an hour ago, the GPS tracker stopped sending location data. There is lots of lightning out there and the storm is blowing right on top of Diana. The signal is most likely being blocked by the storm.

All the warm calm weather from earlier today is now churning with the upper atmosphere, creating lightning, rain and winds. As they say in Key West, it’s kind of like like mixing a mojito!

–Alex de Cordoba in Los Angeles

Storm satellite photo from NOAA


Join the Xtreme Dream Team! Any donation, no matter how small, makes you part of the Team.

A Squall Blows Over

 

Sunday 7:43pm EST 28:00 Swim time

Angie Sollinger with the Media Ops team reported that just after 8pm EDT “all hell broke loose here.” Out of nowhere, a squall “blew up very quick” and hit the flotilla with winds at one point reaching 14 knots, pushing Diana east. Stationed in Key West, Vanessa Linsley was closely monitoring the radar and giving Ops Chief Mark Sollinger regular updates. Vanessa believes that most likely they were waiting out the storm as it was building to the east and were trying to move west around it to avoid any potential lightning.

At this time, 1:00am EDT, we believe that the worst of the storm has moved past them and it is starting to settle down, though they are still experiencing moderate rainfall. Diana is in good spirits and is feeling strong. There have been no jellyfish sightings. The GPS tracker shows they have resumed their heading north towards Key West at a good pace. Stay tuned for more updates as they come in.

–Alex de Cordoba in Los Angeles

Join the Xtreme Dream Team! Any donation, no matter how small, makes you part of the Team.

Ops Chief Mark Sollinger’s Day 2 Report


video Gunnar Schrage
 

Sunday 7:43pm EDT 28:00 Swim time
Ops Chief Mark Sollinger recaps the day and talks about preparing for nightfall.

“Today was an awesome day.”
“We made it through last night.”
“The sea layed down, it was flat, flat, flat, it was a classic day.”
“We played the Black Eyed Peas for her, It’s gonna be a good good night for her.”

 



Join the Xtreme Dream Team! Any donation, no matter how small, makes you part of the Team.

Ideal Conditions


photo Christi Barli
 

5:50pm EST 26:07 Swim time

Diana Nyad has traveled 27.72 statute miles at a consistent 50 strokes per minute. She is very alert and has told the team that the last 45 minutes felt like her best yet. The Voyager crew reports that after a rough first night, she is currently savoring ideal conditions yet preparing for the coming hours, should Mother Nature decide to get moody.

 


photo Christi Barli
 


photo Christi Barli
 


photo Christi Barli

–Angie Sollinger aboard Quest

Join the Xtreme Dream Team! Any donation, no matter how small, makes you part of the Team.

The Lucky Manatee


image via Manatees.net

On Tuesday, day before hearing good news of a possible weather window for the Cuba to Florida swim, diana and bonnie spotted a manatee right before slipping into the water for would become Diana’s last training swim, the perfect taper. Manatees approach boats sometimes here in search of a hosing off and a drink of fresh water, and this one wasn’t disappointed. She swam with diana for a couple of hours, much to the swimmer’s delight. Next day, the weather forecast improved, making the manatee seem even more the lucky omen.

–Candace Hogan

Singing Songs


video Gunnar Schrade
 

Sunday 3:20pm EST 23:37 Swim time

Diana is currently swimming strongly at the same pace, at 23.92 statute miles. Approaching 24 hours into the swim, she is singing songs and counting (to herself of course), two well-practiced techniques for getting through each day, then each night, dividing them into manageable pieces. She’s used these rhythmic methods on training swims in preparation for the big swim, both last year and this year. It’s significant that she is able to employ them now because during both attempts last summer she was under such duress throughout that she could not. It’s a good sign when the swimmer is singing.

 


Diana singing The Beatles


Join the Xtreme Dream Team! Any donation, no matter how small, makes you part of the Team.

No Stopping Her Now


photo Christi Barli
 

Sunday 11:00am EST 19:17 Swim time

At 22.2 statute miles into a swim that started yesterday (Saturday) at 3:43 p.m.,Diana, swimming steadily at 50 strokes per minute, looks very comfortable and confident.


photo Christi Barli

She seemed lifted at the news from her navigator, John Bartlett, that there will be only one more full night of swimming, rather than two, if things hold.* (He means wind, waves, and weather.)

The dark night is usually the most difficult time for distance swimmers, although historically Diana has often enjoyed the nighttimes, singing to herself and thinking.


photo Christi Barli

The proliferation of jellyfish over the Gulf Stream has changed all that, since their preferred time to rise to the surface is at night. Regardless, according to her crew at daybreak, “There’s no stopping her now.”


photo Christi Barli

–Candace Lyle Hogan aboard Quest

*UPDATE 1PM EST: Apologies to all: in reporting to you, we strive for absolute accuracy under precarious conditions—fatigue, hard-to-hear VHF calls, etc. can lead to miscommunication. The following correction is very important: earlier today we reported that Diana would face only one more full night of swimming, but it will be two nights, a very significant fact considering that jellyfish rise to the surface at night.


Join the Xtreme Dream Team! Any donation, no matter how small, makes you part of the Team.